Thursday, February 10, 2011

Share your favorite horror!

Hello everyone,

Who are your favorite horror authors and books?  Post a comment with title or author, and I'll add their covers below with a link to our catalog.  The horror genre is not one of my strong areas to discuss, though I have read a few and enjoyed them, especially Stephen King and Anne Rice.  However, I have enlisted the help of all our staff, so I also have their favorites to add. 

Hope to see you in our library someday soon,
Jan

: :  Request each book from the Bangor Public Library by clicking on the cover  : :
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21 comments:

  1. The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons was the creepiest book I ever read. You could just feel the emotions while you're reading it, and feel what the characters were going through.

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  2. Some authors for you...

    John Saul--supernatural, weird horror stuff.
    John Sandford--his books are more character driven, so they are creepy on an emotional level.
    Robert Bloch--old school.
    Robin Cook--a popular favorite.

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  3. This recommendation is from a staff member:

    "Val McDermid's Tony Hill series is super creepy. Her books are usually considered thriller/suspense/mystery, but it has a lot of violent elements, and the torture angle makes it a horror to me."

    I've posted the first book in the series above - The Mermaids Singing.

    Happy reading! :o)
    ~Jan

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  4. Clive Barker's Hellbound Heart is awesome. It is the basis of the film Hellraiser (Pinhead). This is a short read only 164 pages but it packs a grisly punch. The suspense is taut, and you know that something bad is coming the whole way through. Clive Barker's stuff always seems to involve puzzles of some kind too.

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  5. Not all his books are horror, but Dan Simmons is pretty good. He writes supernatural horror. Another good supernatural horror author is Dean Koontz, his older books especially.

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  6. My favorite Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child book is The Ice Limit.

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  7. Here's my recommendation---John Saul's Midnight Voices.

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  8. John Saul has a book called The Blackstone Chronicles which is very reminiscent of Anne Siddons' House Nextdoor. It has characters that draw you into their horror, terror, humiliation, pain and make you really feel it. It was released in chapters (like Stephen King's Green Mile) but also as a single volume. It is a creepy read and suspenseful as well. And hey, it has an insane ayslum which always good!

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  9. There are so many different kinds or horror. And we could probably argue all day about what does and does not constitute a horror genre book, but I think horror is the heart of the reader. Take the Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Considered a satircial tour de force, I would call it horror.
    And a book that is quite like Handmaid's Tale is The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist. The Unit is great. It is a story about life, in what could be the very near future, where women over fifty and men over sixty who are childless or don't have jobs in "positive industry" are considered dispensable are asked to live apart from the greater population. Here they wait, living lives of ease, until their organs are needed for donation. They donate and donate until.... Well that is definitely horror. It is also well written and compelling, man! you want shout at some of the characters. It is by turns sad, and touching, and scary as hell. And then when you're finished you pick up the daily newspaper and holy cow, how close are we to that future? Horror.

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  10. Thank you for all your comments! I think we have an interesting thread started on what makes a "horror" novel. Drawing an emotion from the reader is, I agree, the key to a great horror novel. Stephen King is a master at this. Pet Sematary, for example. What would a parent do, if they had the chance to see their child one more time? As a parent, there isn't a greater emotion, or fear, SK could have pulled from me.
    ~Jan

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  11. I felt the same way with CUJO.

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  12. I have never been a horror reader, but you have listed some titles here that sound compelling. I like character driven books, and I guess I have always put horror into the same category of "horror movies", like Jason and Freddie, and never thought the stories had more depth besides the fear factor. I like Dean Koontz but I think of him as supernatural suspense. I may give one of these a try.

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  13. Ah Ayeah, but "sometimes dead is bettah" - Jud Crandall in Pet Sematary.

    I think a good character driven horror is Needful Things by Stephen King (the King of Horror, I so proclaim). He takes each character in turn and brings you right inside them, to see what makes them tick, what they fear, what they love, what they think of themselves, and what they need. There are a couple scenes in this book that made me cry. And I almost put it down after one of these. But I am glad I finished it! It is super and for a while you walk around wondering about the people you meet, what are their needful things?

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  14. Ooooo. If you want talk about the fears of a parent regarding her chlid read Cujo (Stephen King again of course). I know everyone thinks it is about a big nasty rabid dog, but it is not. That is a device he uses (a horrible, scary one, for the dog too) to tell a story about a parent trying to preserve and save the life of her son, and the lengths she will go to do this. The fears and horrors she will face and endure to protect her baby in a crazy situation. If you are under 20 years old and reading Cujo, please remember there were no cell phones!

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  15. I went through a huge King phase, starting with The Shining. The man is an amazing author.

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  16. I have just finished World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks. It caught my eye as I was volunteering at the library a couple of weeks ago (I go through the new acquisitions looking for "holds"). Although I guess it is a horror story, it ends up being a really interesting look at the possible social, political and economic reactions to the rise of the dead. Rather than following one character, we are given a series of recollections from people all over the world, including the commander of the International Space Station. Many of the vignettes are moving, though some are disturbing as they follow individuals and their methods of survival. Being a pet-lover I was very moved by the piece about the use of dogs in the fight against the undead, whilst the small section on man-eating feral cats made me laugh out loud . . . I always knew that their cute fluffiness was a cover for evil :) A real page turner, that I thoroughly recommend.

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  17. Sue, I'm still giggling over the cat comment. I had to give my cat away because my English Bulldog wanted to eat him, a beautiful yellow tiger named
    Max. Max could have used a little evil, even though his original name was Satan, renamed to Max, and now Pumpkin. I miss him but he's in a bulldog safe zone now.

    Can you tell I'm an animal lover too?

    Anyway, this book sounds really cool.

    Jan

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  18. I have just added Horns by Joe Hill to the mix above, another great character driven horror, and also a book group recommendation from Sarah.

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  19. I just finished reading Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and it is a great book. I think it is currently being made into a movie, so read it before you see it! It is much like the Unit by Ninni Holmqvist in the topic, but deals with children rather than adults. If you thought the Unit was creepy and compelling try this book and see how focusing on these chosen children adds another layer to the horror. I don't think this book is traditionally considered horror, but I covered my views on that in a previous post. Never Let Me Go follows the lives of three individuals, who we first meet as young teens, as they leave "school" and enter the world at 18. It is told from the point of view of one of the girls and is told in flashbacks and memories all of which ring true in voice. Check it out, and see if you're not watching the Science pages of your local paper when you finish.

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  20. By the way Horror lovers, May is Zombie Awareness Month! Don't forget to wear your gray ribbon! Don't know what the heck I am talking about? Check this out: http://zombieresearch.org/zombieawarenessmonth.html

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  21. Kelly, thanks for the great recommendation!!
    Jan

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