Saturday, September 24, 2016

Books for October

This month I am proud to announce that we have selected our very first Non-Fiction title: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. I have heard so much praise for this hybrid of science fact and biography, and so many people have recommended it to me, that I am pleased that it is one of our choices this month. The other is another offering from the amazing Neil Gaiman and I am sure that his Coraline will put us all in the mood for Halloween.

The books are now available on the Nook accounts and are ready for download.


Coraline by Neil Gaiman


Coraline's often wondered what's behind the locked door in the drawing room. It reveals only a brick wall when she finally opens it, but when she tries again later, a passageway mysteriously appears. She is surprised to find a flat decorated exactly like her own, but strangely different. And when she finds her "other" parents in this alternate world, they are much more interesting despite their creepy black button eyes. When they make it clear, however, that they want to make her theirs forever, she begins a nightmarish game to rescue her real parents and three children imprisoned in a mirror. With only a bored-through stone and an aloof cat to help, Coraline confronts the harrowing task of escaping these monstrous creatures.







The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Henrietta Lacks, as HeLa, is known to present-day scientists for her cells from cervical cancer. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells were taken without her knowledge and still live decades after her death. Cells descended from her may weigh more than 50M metric tons.

HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks was buried in an unmarked grave.


The dark history of experimentation on African Americans helped lead to the birth of bioethics, and legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.


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